You have 0 items in your shopping cart

Sujith Kumar Gs Mandya

Bangalore, India 10 Followers

About Artist

THE BULL An Aesthetics of anxiety ‘Painting is not done to decorate apartments. It is an instrument of war’ - Pablo Picasso The bull is the universal image, one can see the b...

Read More

THE BULL
An Aesthetics of anxiety

‘Painting is not done to decorate apartments.
It is an instrument of war’
- Pablo Picasso

The bull is the universal image, one can see the bull perceived visually since pre-historic period. The puranic visual literality also illustrate the glory of the bull1. We can find the imagery of bull in an European and Indian context of rock art tradition2. We know that the cave paintings were all about ‘Sympathetic magic’3. In the earlier days of ancient ritualistic sensibility the never ending deadly confrontation of ‘man and bull’ continued even today. Most of the artists perceived this sensibility vividly through the ages. The Psychological context of motivations also nervated their perceptions. We can feel this in the bulls of primitive painters to Picasso to Sujith Kumar Mandya. Hence an anxiety of influence is always there.
The bulls of Sujith Kumar express the inner anguish of contemporary techno human mind. Here the bull is perceived as metaphorical aesthetics of an anxious mind. These mysterious paintings are a spectacle of hurt, shocked, violent, revolting bull’s artistry and symbolism.
The focused images of ‘THE BULL’ that sparks Sujithkumar’s paintings absorbed the human characteristics surrealistically. The bull; the beast of power and ardor is charged with abundant feelings dramatically articulated in the deconstructed frame. Sujithkumar’s anxious bull multiplied with an amalgamation of the primitive and contemporaneous sensibilities meditatively.

October 2013 - K.V. Subramanyam
Visual Art historian

NOTES :

1. Meditation on Vrushabha (Bull) as described in the shaivagama Dharma appears in the form of Shiva’
- Mummadi Krishnaraja Wodeyar (1794-1868 A.D.)
In Shivanidhi of Sritattvanidhi.

2. Salon of the bulls at Lascaux near Montignac, France, C. 18000 B.C. Also at Bhimbedka near Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. Here Benakal, Chikkaramapura, Mallapura, Billamarayana Gudda, Maski, Kuppagallu in Karnataka, and recently discovered Raya Durga rock shelter in Andhra Pradesh and many other prehistoric sites.

3. Hunting is a skill, some times dangerous activity. What if the process could be made easier by art? French archaeologist Abbe Henri Breuil (1877-1961), made this suggestion the basis for his theory that cave paintings were all about ‘Sympathetic magic’.

-------------------------------------------------

INVISIBLE GREENS

All alone, he rides back to green

Riding along the streets of Mysore, as an art student at Shree Kala Niketana School of Art, what haunted the imagination of Sujith Kumar was not the magnificent palace or the people moving without any hurry along the crowded streets of the laid-back city. Sure, he would sketch monuments and human faces to his heart’s content but rather than the beauty and solitude of humans it was the cycles and auto rickshaws that provoked Sujith's imagination, thus kindling his creative power.
“Had there been only cycles and auto rickshaws in this world we would have been a happier lot, the world would have been greener and healthier,” says the artist. His words also have that minimalist touch, like his lines. It was this ‘healthy’ thought, which inspired Sujith to embark upon a series on auto rickshaws and cycles, which he would call ‘Traffic Control’.
He sees the same cycle and auto rickshaw in different perspective, but every time you see these images you realise that it is a different one though it is the same. As Heraclitus once said, “You cannot step twice into the same river, for other waters are continually flowing in.” Likewise whenever you draw the image it becomes a new one. And that newness is the invisible force behind Sujith's compositions.
“Cycle is a dream and a carrier of life for the rustic Indian middle class. Every time I look at the same cycle it appears to be a new one to me; in a way it is the cycle of life…” he says.
Though the cycles and auto rickshaws in Sujith’s paintings are placed in an urban setting, it is far away from the hullabaloo of the city life. It is utter silence that pervades in these compositions. With a few suggestive strokes of the electric lamp posts and traffic signals he gives a picture of the urban life (and lifelessness, at times). His earlier paintings of the human life in the urban dwellings also have the same quality of silence and solitude.
In the backdrop of the burning issue of global warming, there is an eco-sensitive approach in Sujith’s works. When he sees urbanscapes without the onslaught of any motor vehicles except the auto rickshaws, his art is actually getting transformed into a vehicle of the ecological concerns of a straightforward human being.
Interestingly, the image of the water bottle that crops up here and there in his compositions should be seen in this context only. As we all know water is the casualty of the urban onslaught.
“I can’t see any humanity in city life, there is no peace…. It’s all rat race, but in villages you see the real humanity living in peace…” In a way Sujith talks about going back to nature with his tiny images of cycles.
However, the politics and ecological concerns apart, what strikes the viewer is the ease with which he handles the lines, which is not very common in oil paintings. And there lies the strength of the artist who brought perfection to his lines over the years with his pencil.
“As a student in Mysore it was a routine for me to draw people, places and objects to my heart’s content,” says this young artist. “My concern had always been to create an object with minimum strokes.”
Though in the initial stage Sujith’s canvases were the playground of human forms, later they vanished into the hazy background of the urban settings and the cycles and auto rickshaws emerged from the invisible streets.
Despite the recurrence of the same images in almost all canvases, what one feels is a kind of continuity from one composition to another. With the use of colours and the strength of his lines Sujith recreates a world that we have all failed to recognize, though it is around us.
Sujith’s cycle is riding back to nature. From the crowded cityscapes to the lush green landscapes of serenity. It is a ride back to the never-ending green...

P. Sudhakaran is a Bangalore-based art critic and journalist.

Read Less

39 Artworks for sale

1 Sold Artworks

Testimonials

  • BIODATA

  • About Artist

    THE BULL
    An Aesthetics of anxiety

    ‘Painting is not done to decorate apartments.
    It is an instrument of war’
    - Pablo Picasso

    The bull is the universal image, one can see the bull perceived visually since pre-historic period. The puranic visual literality also illustrate the glory of the bull1. We can find the imagery of bull in an European and Indian context of rock art tradition2. We know that the cave paintings were all about ‘Sympathetic magic’3. In the earlier days of ancient ritualistic sensibility the never ending deadly confrontation of ‘man and bull’ continued even today. Most of the artists perceived this sensibility vividly through the ages. The Psychological context of motivations also nervated their perceptions. We can feel this in the bulls of primitive painters to Picasso to Sujith Kumar Mandya. Hence an anxiety of influence is always there.
    The bulls of Sujith Kumar express the inner anguish of contemporary techno human mind. Here the bull is perceived as metaphorical aesthetics of an anxious mind. These mysterious paintings are a spectacle of hurt, shocked, violent, revolting bull’s artistry and symbolism.
    The focused images of ‘THE BULL’ that sparks Sujithkumar’s paintings absorbed the human characteristics surrealistically. The bull; the beast of power and ardor is charged with abundant feelings dramatically articulated in the deconstructed frame. Sujithkumar’s anxious bull multiplied with an amalgamation of the primitive and contemporaneous sensibilities meditatively.

    October 2013 - K.V. Subramanyam
    Visual Art historian

    NOTES :

    1. Meditation on Vrushabha (Bull) as described in the shaivagama Dharma appears in the form of Shiva’
    - Mummadi Krishnaraja Wodeyar (1794-1868 A.D.)
    In Shivanidhi of Sritattvanidhi.

    2. Salon of the bulls at Lascaux near Montignac, France, C. 18000 B.C. Also at Bhimbedka near Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. Here Benakal, Chikkaramapura, Mallapura, Billamarayana Gudda, Maski, Kuppagallu in Karnataka, and recently discovered Raya Durga rock shelter in Andhra Pradesh and many other prehistoric sites.

    3. Hunting is a skill, some times dangerous activity. What if the process could be made easier by art? French archaeologist Abbe Henri Breuil (1877-1961), made this suggestion the basis for his theory that cave paintings were all about ‘Sympathetic magic’.

    -------------------------------------------------

    INVISIBLE GREENS

    All alone, he rides back to green

    Riding along the streets of Mysore, as an art student at Shree Kala Niketana School of Art, what haunted the imagination of Sujith Kumar was not the magnificent palace or the people moving without any hurry along the crowded streets of the laid-back city. Sure, he would sketch monuments and human faces to his heart’s content but rather than the beauty and solitude of humans it was the cycles and auto rickshaws that provoked Sujith's imagination, thus kindling his creative power.
    “Had there been only cycles and auto rickshaws in this world we would have been a happier lot, the world would have been greener and healthier,” says the artist. His words also have that minimalist touch, like his lines. It was this ‘healthy’ thought, which inspired Sujith to embark upon a series on auto rickshaws and cycles, which he would call ‘Traffic Control’.
    He sees the same cycle and auto rickshaw in different perspective, but every time you see these images you realise that it is a different one though it is the same. As Heraclitus once said, “You cannot step twice into the same river, for other waters are continually flowing in.” Likewise whenever you draw the image it becomes a new one. And that newness is the invisible force behind Sujith's compositions.
    “Cycle is a dream and a carrier of life for the rustic Indian middle class. Every time I look at the same cycle it appears to be a new one to me; in a way it is the cycle of life…” he says.
    Though the cycles and auto rickshaws in Sujith’s paintings are placed in an urban setting, it is far away from the hullabaloo of the city life. It is utter silence that pervades in these compositions. With a few suggestive strokes of the electric lamp posts and traffic signals he gives a picture of the urban life (and lifelessness, at times). His earlier paintings of the human life in the urban dwellings also have the same quality of silence and solitude.
    In the backdrop of the burning issue of global warming, there is an eco-sensitive approach in Sujith’s works. When he sees urbanscapes without the onslaught of any motor vehicles except the auto rickshaws, his art is actually getting transformed into a vehicle of the ecological concerns of a straightforward human being.
    Interestingly, the image of the water bottle that crops up here and there in his compositions should be seen in this context only. As we all know water is the casualty of the urban onslaught.
    “I can’t see any humanity in city life, there is no peace…. It’s all rat race, but in villages you see the real humanity living in peace…” In a way Sujith talks about going back to nature with his tiny images of cycles.
    However, the politics and ecological concerns apart, what strikes the viewer is the ease with which he handles the lines, which is not very common in oil paintings. And there lies the strength of the artist who brought perfection to his lines over the years with his pencil.
    “As a student in Mysore it was a routine for me to draw people, places and objects to my heart’s content,” says this young artist. “My concern had always been to create an object with minimum strokes.”
    Though in the initial stage Sujith’s canvases were the playground of human forms, later they vanished into the hazy background of the urban settings and the cycles and auto rickshaws emerged from the invisible streets.
    Despite the recurrence of the same images in almost all canvases, what one feels is a kind of continuity from one composition to another. With the use of colours and the strength of his lines Sujith recreates a world that we have all failed to recognize, though it is around us.
    Sujith’s cycle is riding back to nature. From the crowded cityscapes to the lush green landscapes of serenity. It is a ride back to the never-ending green...

    P. Sudhakaran is a Bangalore-based art critic and journalist.

  • Academics

    2006 A.M [Art master] & G.D in Drawing & Painting, Shree Kala Niketana, School of Art, Mysore.

  • Exhibitions

    SOLO EXHIBITIONS

    2011 Karnataka Chitra Kala Parishat, Bangalore

    2011 Indian Art Festival Nehru Centre, Mumbai

    2010 Karnataka Chitra Kala Parishat, Bangalore



    GROUP EXHIBITIONS

    2011 Veda art Gallery, Bangalore

    2011 Karnataka Chitra Kala Parishat, Bangalore

    2010 U B City Art Exhibition, Bangalore

    2010 Birla Academy Art Exhibition, Kolkata

    2010 OPC Habitat Centre Art Exhibition, Delhi

    2010 Camel 12th Southern Region Art Exhibition, Hyderabad

    2009 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2009 Painting Exhibition, Pratima's Art Gallery, Bangalore

    2009 Muddushree Utsava painting Exhibition, Bangalore

    2008 38th Karnataka Lalit Kala Academy Art Exhibition

    2008 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2007 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2006 Suvarana Karnataka Art Exhibition, Bangalore

    2006 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2005 Dasara Art Exhibition, Mysore

    2005 ABVP Art Exhibition, Mysore

    2005 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2004 33th Karnataka Lalit Kala Academy Art Exhibition

    2004 Camel 6th southern Art Exhibition

    2004 Kinnala Exhibition, Mysore

    2004 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2003 Etchin Exhibition, Mysore

    2003 7th Karanataka Kalamela, Bangalore

    2003 Bangalore Chitra Santhe Art Exhibition

    2002 Traditional Exhibition, Mysore

    2001 Hampi Landscape Exhibition, Mysore

    2001 Kannada Sahithya Sammelana Art Exhibition, Tumkur

    2000 Landscape Exhibition, Mysore

  • Testimonial

    Mojarto.com is One of a Kind portal and an absolute bliss for upcoming artists like me. I have sold quite a number of paintings through Mojarto.com. It has been a wonderful experience as an artist. The members of Mojarto.com are very kind and always helpful. They strive for publicity of every artist with same dedication, be him an amateur or professional. The transactions are always clear and without any hassles. I am proud to be a part of Mojarto.com community.

    I thank Mojarto.com for providing me an opportunity to showcase my work on their portal.

Top